The Near-Sighted Monkey

Dear Students,

Whatever it is you are doing right now? This song goes with it.

Sincerely,

Prof. Bootsy

demonagerie:

Ulrich von Pottenstein: Cyrillusfabeln - BSB Cgm 254, [S.l.] Bayern, 1430

demonagerie:

Ulrich von Pottenstein: Cyrillusfabeln - BSB Cgm 254, [S.l.] Bayern, 1430

Little comics everywhere. Even, like, in the year 1430.
demonagerie:

Ulrich von Pottenstein: Cyrillusfabeln - BSB Cgm 254, [S.l.] Bayern, 1430

Little comics everywhere. Even, like, in the year 1430.

demonagerie:

Ulrich von Pottenstein: Cyrillusfabeln - BSB Cgm 254, [S.l.] Bayern, 1430

Dear Students,

One way I memorize names is to write them slowly by hand. Here are some of your character names written on Saturday morning. Still to come: Mighty Manfred, Totoro, Robin Hood, SELCO, Wuggie Norple, Pegasus, Martha Stewart, Percy and Chef Boyardee! 

Got them all!

I can’t wait to see you in class on Wednesday

Sincerely,

Professor Bootsy.

edlorado:

Waljinah - Rahaju

Dear Students,

This is what I am singing as I imagine our upcoming semester together.  I’m seriously out on the back porch, singing this in your direction.

Sincerely,

Professor Bootsy

Little comics everywhere. Even in the year 1738.

magictransistor:

Zoroaster, Clavis Artis, MS. Verginelli-Rota, Roma, c. 1738.

magictransistor:

Athanasius Kircher. Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae (The Great Art of Light and Shadow). 1646.

Dear Students,
This is the original digital device.
Sincerely,
Professor Chewbacca
La Mano

Dear Students,

This is the original digital device.

Sincerely,

Professor Chewbacca

La Mano

Dear Students,

Just black lines, one after the next.

You can do this!

Sincerely,

Professor Bootsy

nevver:

William Thomas Horton (1898)


Dearest Students,
Here are some thoughts about the composition notebooks we’ll be using all semester. 
Yours will l be waiting for you when you come to class on Wednesday. All you’ll need to bring is a black flair pen, your three ring binder with plastic sleeves and a roll of scotch tape.
Sincerely,
Professor Bootsy

Dearest Students,

Here are some thoughts about the composition notebooks we’ll be using all semester.

Yours will l be waiting for you when you come to class on Wednesday. All you’ll need to bring is a black flair pen, your three ring binder with plastic sleeves and a roll of scotch tape.

Sincerely,

Professor Bootsy


From Science Daily
Going Through the Motions Improves Dance Performance
July 23, 2013 — Expert ballet dancers seem to glide effortlessly across the stage, but learning the steps is both physically and mentally demanding. New research suggests that dance marking — loosely practicing a routine by “going through the motions” — may improve the quality of dance performance by reducing the mental strain needed to perfect the movements.


The new findings, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggest that marking may alleviate the conflict between the cognitive and physical aspects of dance practice, allowing dancers to memorize and repeat steps more fluidly.
Researcher Edward Warburton, a former professional ballet dancer, and colleagues were interested in exploring the “thinking behind the doing of dance.”
"It is widely assumed that the purpose of marking is to conserve energy," explains Warburton, professor of dance at the University of California, Santa Cruz. "But elite-level dance is not only physically demanding, it’s cognitively demanding as well:
Learning and rehearsing a dance piece requires concentration on many aspects of the desired performance.”
Marking essentially involves a run-through of the dance routine, but with a focus on the routine itself, rather than making the perfect movements.
"When marking, the dancer often does not leave the floor, and may even substitute hand gestures for movements," Warburton explains. "One common example is using a finger rotation to represent a turn while not actually turning the whole body."
To investigate how marking influences performance, the researchers asked a group of talented dance students to learn two routines: they were asked to practice one routine at performance speed and to practice the other one by marking.
The routines were relatively simple, designed to be learned quickly and to minimize mistakes. Yet differences emerged when the judges looked for quality of performance.
Across many of the different techniques and steps, the dancers were judged more highly on the routine that they had practiced with marking — their movements on the marked routine appeared to be more seamless, their sequences more fluid.
The researchers surmise that practicing at performance speed didn’t allow the dancers to memorize and consolidate the steps as a sequence, thus encumbering their performance.
"By reducing the demands on complex control of the body, marking may reduce the multi-layered cognitive load used when learning choreography," Warburton explains.
While marking is often thought of as a necessary evil — allowing dancers a “break” from dancing full out — the large effect sizes observed in the study suggest that it could make a noticeable difference in a dancer’s performance:
"Marking could be strategically used by teachers and choreographers to enhance memory and integration of multiple aspects of a piece precisely at those times when dancers are working to master the most demanding material," says Warburton.
It’s unclear whether these performance improvements would be seen for other types of dance, Warburton cautions, but it is possible that this area of research could extend to other kinds of activities, perhaps even language acquisition.
"Smaller scale movement systems with low energetic costs such as speech, sign language, and gestures may likewise accrue cognitive benefits, as might be the case in learning new multisyllabic vocabulary or working on one’s accent in a foreign language."

From Science Daily

Going Through the Motions Improves Dance Performance

July 23, 2013 — Expert ballet dancers seem to glide effortlessly across the stage, but learning the steps is both physically and mentally demanding. New research suggests that dance marking — loosely practicing a routine by “going through the motions” — may improve the quality of dance performance by reducing the mental strain needed to perfect the movements.


The new findings, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggest that marking may alleviate the conflict between the cognitive and physical aspects of dance practice, allowing dancers to memorize and repeat steps more fluidly.

Researcher Edward Warburton, a former professional ballet dancer, and colleagues were interested in exploring the “thinking behind the doing of dance.”

"It is widely assumed that the purpose of marking is to conserve energy," explains Warburton, professor of dance at the University of California, Santa Cruz. "But elite-level dance is not only physically demanding, it’s cognitively demanding as well:

Learning and rehearsing a dance piece requires concentration on many aspects of the desired performance.”

Marking essentially involves a run-through of the dance routine, but with a focus on the routine itself, rather than making the perfect movements.

"When marking, the dancer often does not leave the floor, and may even substitute hand gestures for movements," Warburton explains. "One common example is using a finger rotation to represent a turn while not actually turning the whole body."

To investigate how marking influences performance, the researchers asked a group of talented dance students to learn two routines: they were asked to practice one routine at performance speed and to practice the other one by marking.

The routines were relatively simple, designed to be learned quickly and to minimize mistakes. Yet differences emerged when the judges looked for quality of performance.

Across many of the different techniques and steps, the dancers were judged more highly on the routine that they had practiced with marking — their movements on the marked routine appeared to be more seamless, their sequences more fluid.

The researchers surmise that practicing at performance speed didn’t allow the dancers to memorize and consolidate the steps as a sequence, thus encumbering their performance.

"By reducing the demands on complex control of the body, marking may reduce the multi-layered cognitive load used when learning choreography," Warburton explains.

While marking is often thought of as a necessary evil — allowing dancers a “break” from dancing full out — the large effect sizes observed in the study suggest that it could make a noticeable difference in a dancer’s performance:

"Marking could be strategically used by teachers and choreographers to enhance memory and integration of multiple aspects of a piece precisely at those times when dancers are working to master the most demanding material," says Warburton.

It’s unclear whether these performance improvements would be seen for other types of dance, Warburton cautions, but it is possible that this area of research could extend to other kinds of activities, perhaps even language acquisition.

"Smaller scale movement systems with low energetic costs such as speech, sign language, and gestures may likewise accrue cognitive benefits, as might be the case in learning new multisyllabic vocabulary or working on one’s accent in a foreign language."

Dear Students,
Looking for something to draw on the last Saturday night before school begins? This guy will never disappoint you, though you’ll have to imagine what the bottom of his dynamic instrument might look like.
Set a timer for 15 minutes. When it goes off you have 5 more minutes to finish up.
Best to you,
Professor Bootsy

Dear Students,

Looking for something to draw on the last Saturday night before school begins? This guy will never disappoint you, though you’ll have to imagine what the bottom of his dynamic instrument might look like.

Set a timer for 15 minutes. When it goes off you have 5 more minutes to finish up.

Best to you,

Professor Bootsy

thenearsightedmonkey:

Titles of  stories written by the 26 students in Lynda Barry’s “What It Is” class at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2012

Wild about School Lunch!

Wild about School Lunch!

Dear DrawBridge Students,

I believe we are going to have a very very good semester.

Sincerely,

Professor Bootsy

Above: “Beatrice Addressing Dante” circa 1824 by William Blake; painter, poet, print-maker; London, England 

Below: “And Everything is Back to Normal” 2012 by Andy,  2nd Grader, Franklin Elementary school; Madison, Wisconsin