The Near-Sighted Monkey

Here are some photos sent to us by Angela Richardson

These giant hand-made books are on display in the “Wood Works” show at A+D Gallery, Chicago, IL

Work called  “A Deer Tale” by John Henley

More here 

And here

Book cover designs for the Gaberbocchus Press 

by Franciszka Themerson (28 June 1907 - 29 June 1988)  painter, illustrator, filmmaker and stage designer.

Thank you to Angela Richardson (4 of Hearts) for letting introducing us to Thermerson’s work.

On Saturday, September 7th, Lynda Barry joined Angela Richardson and Lauren Kelly and a lot of kids at The Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery’s Science Saturday event. Together they made some tiny books for a tiny library of the future.

On Saturday, September 7th, Lynda Barry joined Angela Richardson and Lauren Kelly and a lot of kids at The Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery’s Science Saturday event. Together they made some tiny books for a tiny library of the future.

Assignment: Draw your brain, then draw your mind.

Images from Science Saturday, August 3, 2013,   Image Lab, The Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Hosted by Angela Richardson and Lynda Barry

What happened during Science Saturday, August 3, 2013, in the Image Lab, on the first floor of The Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, University of Wisconsin, Madison? What do you have IN MIND?

Assignment: Draw your brain, then draw your mind.

Angela Richardson (MFA Grad Student, Department of Art) and Lynda Barry (Assistant Prof in Interdisciplinary Creativity) hosted a drawing jam for kids. Pictures from yesterday’s Drawing Jam at the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. Part of Science Saturday.

What do you have IN MIND? Angela Richardson and Lynda Barry host a drawing jam for kids (and the adults they bring with with them) from 10 am to 12:00 noon on Science Saturday, August 3, 2013, in The Image Lab, on the first floor of The Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

thegreatravelledknot:

Let’s jam!

As part of the SATURDAY SCIENCE AT DISCOVERY event at the WID on 8/3, we’ll be hosting a DRAWING JAM at THE IMAGE LAB. It’s when we all get together to MAKE ART! We’ll draw on paper, on each other’s drawings…we’ll even draw on the wall! It will be seriously FUN.

Saturday Science at Discovery is a FREE EVENT for kids and adults. In August, it celebrates SCIENCE, CREATIVITY, and INVENTION. Our theme for the drawing jam is THE HUMAN MIND — since none of that stuff can happen without it, right?

Put on your thinking cap and get ready to draw to your brain’s delight. We’re bringing all of the supplies — the only thing we need you to bring is your IMAGINATION.

Saturday Science at Discovery is held on the first Saturday of every month. at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery (WID) on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus.

The Image Lab is located is the northwest corner of the WID on the first floor. It’s nearest the intersection of University and Randall. See you there on Saturday!

thegreatravelledknot:

Not knowing

"That active state of not knowing is what’s required for insight." - Professor Long-Title (aka Lynda Barry)

With that wise thought in mind, I’ve riffed on some very old drawings of that depict the visual system (2nd row,  left, Ibn al-Haytham, 11th c.), the central nervous system (2nd row, middle, Masur bin Muhammad, 15th c.), and ventricular theory (last row, right, artist unknown, 1292.) The other drawings above are mine (Angela Richardson, 2013.)

What am I up to here? Why am I making these drawings? I’m not exactly sure. For now, I’m okay not knowing. I expect something will be revealed through the making that I can’t know until I’ve made LOTS of them.

From the July 18, 2013 Image Lab field trip to the Madison Children’s Museum, to see an exhibit of images of the brain and the mind made by kids:
Tory Center, age 13, Eagle School 
"My piece is a file of my life and it is organized in drawers. The colors on the front represent my immediate reaction to what color I would believe represents the subject. I felt a lot of red colors. (I don’t know why)."

From the July 18, 2013 Image Lab field trip to the Madison Children’s Museum, to see an exhibit of images of the brain and the mind made by kids:

Tory Center, age 13, Eagle School

"My piece is a file of my life and it is organized in drawers. The colors on the front represent my immediate reaction to what color I would believe represents the subject. I felt a lot of red colors. (I don’t know why)."

From the July 18, 2013 Image Lab field trip to the Madison Children’s Museum, to see an exhibit of images of the brain and the mind made by kids
Andrew Taber, Age 13, Eagle School:
"I made mine like this because there are a ton of things shooting across, BAM BAM CHAOS. Things are overlapping. You can’t focus on one. The colors are random, kind of like thoughts! Mine was not being abstract, but this clarifies the point."

From the July 18, 2013 Image Lab field trip to the Madison Children’s Museum, to see an exhibit of images of the brain and the mind made by kids

Andrew Taber, Age 13, Eagle School:

"I made mine like this because there are a ton of things shooting across, BAM BAM CHAOS. Things are overlapping. You can’t focus on one. The colors are random, kind of like thoughts! Mine was not being abstract, but this clarifies the point."

Today’s Image Lab field trip: Angela Richardson and Professor Long-Title go to the Madison Children’s Museum to see kids making visual images of the brain and mind.
"Brain Art" by Rhys Enderle, age 14, Eagle School
"The whole shape is the brain, while the yellow center is the center of thought. All the thoughts, the good, (pink) and the bad (black) ripple outwards"

Today’s Image Lab field trip: Angela Richardson and Professor Long-Title go to the Madison Children’s Museum to see kids making visual images of the brain and mind.

"Brain Art" by Rhys Enderle, age 14, Eagle School

"The whole shape is the brain, while the yellow center is the center of thought. All the thoughts, the good, (pink) and the bad (black) ripple outwards"

thegreatravelledknot:

"Enclothed cognition"

Above is a photo of me [Angela Richardson] working in The Image Lab of the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery at UW-Madison (photo by Lynda Barry.) I’m wearing a lab coat. I put it on every time I’m here. Why? In part, because I find it fun and pleasurable to have a work uniform. This particular lab coat also has an illustration by Drew Garza silkscreened on its back that I love. It’s a monster drawing itself!

The brain-related reason I wear the lab coat has to do with the power that comes with dressing the part. Hajo Adam and Adam Galinsky of Northwestern University, did a study on what they call “enclothed cognition" exploring the effects that wearing a lab coat has on how our brains work. “A pretest found that a lab coat is generally associated with attentiveness and carefulness. We therefore predicted that wearing a lab coat would increase performance on attention-related tasks." And sure enough, the clothing’s symbolic meaning and the physical experience of wearing a lab coat had a positive effect on test subjects’ cognitive abilities. However, when subjects were told that the coat was an artist’s smock rather than a lab coat belonging to a doctor or scientist, no difference was measured. Hmmmmm…

Well, guess what?! I’m an artist wearing a lab coat that just happens to be splattered in paint. Gotta say, I’m feelin’ pretty sharp.

thegreatravelledknot:

Not an image of the brain per se, but rather, all of the blood vessels that feed it. Beautiful. 
byuneuro:

Magnetic Resonance Angiogram of the #Brain
Magnetic resonance angiography (#MRA) is a group of techniques based on magnetic resonance imaging (#MRI) to image #blood vessels. Magnetic resonance #angiography is used to generate images of the arteries in order to evaluate them for stenosis (abnormal narrowing), #occlusion or #aneurysms (vessel wall dilation that is at risk of rupture). #byu #neuroscience

thegreatravelledknot:

Not an image of the brain per se, but rather, all of the blood vessels that feed it. Beautiful.

byuneuro:

Magnetic Resonance Angiogram of the #Brain

Magnetic resonance angiography (#MRA) is a group of techniques based on magnetic resonance imaging (#MRI) to image #blood vessels. Magnetic resonance #angiography is used to generate images of the arteries in order to evaluate them for stenosis (abnormal narrowing), #occlusion or #aneurysms (vessel wall dilation that is at risk of rupture). #byu #neuroscience

What is going down in The Image Lab?

What is going down in The Image Lab?