The Near-Sighted Monkey

Comp book pages from ‘The Shmoo’

Making Comics Art 448

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dear Students,
Here is a link to the interview with Iain McGilchrist I mentioned at the end of Wednesday’s class. I’d like you to listen to it while you are drawing.  It’s about an hour long.
Interview 
Transcript.
Sincerely,
Professor Chewbacca
P.S. Keep repeating Emily Dickinson’s poem #1603 aloud and in your head. You will need it soon.

Dear Students,

Here is a link to the interview with Iain McGilchrist I mentioned at the end of Wednesday’s class. I’d like you to listen to it while you are drawing.  It’s about an hour long.

Interview

Transcript.

Sincerely,

Professor Chewbacca

P.S. Keep repeating Emily Dickinson’s poem #1603 aloud and in your head. You will need it soon.

typetoy:

www.TypeToy.tumblr.com

Dear Making Comics Class,
I love this drawing. Remember to read the rest of Ivan Brunetti’s book and remember that your ‘final project’ is no different than all our other projects. It can be a series of short stories or a single long story.  Start by making pictures or writing stories on separate pieces of paper. Switch them around and see if a new story, or a series of stories come about. If you want to try drawing on some paper that has more body and no lines and isn’t horribly expensive, I suggest buying THREE pads of Strathmore Series 400 Drawing Paper, sized 8x10. Color-wise it trends toward cream and it’s a good paper for all of the materials we’ve used in class this semester. Three pads will make you feel secure. You will have good paper to spare which is a beautiful feeling that everyone should know.

Sincerely,

Prof. Sluggo

typetoy:

www.TypeToy.tumblr.com

Dear Making Comics Class,

I love this drawing. Remember to read the rest of Ivan Brunetti’s book and remember that your ‘final project’ is no different than all our other projects. It can be a series of short stories or a single long story.  Start by making pictures or writing stories on separate pieces of paper. Switch them around and see if a new story, or a series of stories come about. If you want to try drawing on some paper that has more body and no lines and isn’t horribly expensive, I suggest buying THREE pads of Strathmore Series 400 Drawing Paper, sized 8x10. Color-wise it trends toward cream and it’s a good paper for all of the materials we’ve used in class this semester. Three pads will make you feel secure. You will have good paper to spare which is a beautiful feeling that everyone should know.

Sincerely,

Prof. Sluggo

Dear Making Comics Class,

This was drawn last week by Optimus Prime for our Batman assignment:

This week her drawings have come to life.

Love,

Professor Sluggo

Making Comics, Art 448, University of Wisconsin Madison

The Batman and Emily Dickinson Mash-Up Assignment:

1: Using non-photo blue pencil and a drawing of Batman made by someone else, someone who feels like they can’t really draw,  spend about five minutes drawing that Batman in each of the following scenes. Note- A scene can be one or more panels.

1. Batman on a regular day.

2. Batman at a climactic moment.

3. Batman has a memory of childhood.

4. Batman a few days before the climactic moment.

5. Batman a few days after the climactic moment.

6. Batman reflects.

Other options:

Batman is vomiting.

Batman is devastated and depressed.

Batman is screaming

Batman is feeling really good.

Ink your panels with a brush and Sumi ink.

Now get ten sheets of paper, a copy of Emily Dickinson poem #1116, scissors, glue, and cut up the panels and the lines of the poem and arrange them so each of the ten pages has a line of poetry and an image from your batman sequence.

Then, title the work, design a cover, draw a title page, put the content pages in the correct order, draw a self portrait for your authors page and write a little bio.

Staple it together.

Dang! You just made a book!

These are Maya the Bee’s comp book pages from last weeks Batman and Emily Dickinson mash-up assignment in Making Comics, Art 448, (Taught by Lynda Barry /Professor Sluggo at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.)

Here is what my very badass "Making Comics" class (Art 448!)  at the University of Wisconsin-Madison looked like on October 7th 2013 at about 2:15 pm. They’re standing in front windows loaded up with their work at The Image Lab, located in the Northwest corner of The Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery building.
Professor Sluggo is SO lucky!

Here is what my very badass "Making Comics" class (Art 448!)  at the University of Wisconsin-Madison looked like on October 7th 2013 at about 2:15 pm. They’re standing in front windows loaded up with their work at The Image Lab, located in the Northwest corner of The Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery building.

Professor Sluggo is SO lucky!

Vintage Photobooth pictures c. 1930s-1960s

Dear Making Comics Class,

Extra credit or homework make up assignment. Fold a page into 16 chambers, draw 16 of these photos (your choice) in non-photo blue and then ink them in with a Flair pen. Remember to draw your frame for each picture. What a fun class today! I love the pictures you brought back from the ‘field trip’.

Professor Sluggo

Above: Virgil Finlay
Dear Making Comics Class,
There is so much that can be done with some black ink on a piece of paper or a blade on a black scratch board and some sweet uninterrupted time. Anything that draws a tight edge between jet black and white can take you there. Today in class we talked about spreading our 30 minutes of comp book writing and drawing time across the whole day. This is 30 minutes each day that the back of your mind has to come forward and it has your full attention. It will work even if all you do is  a ten minute non-photo blue drawing in the morning and spend the rest of the day inking it in. And here is nothing wrong with copying a picture you like or even tracing one and working on it all day. The practice is to make sure you do the 30 minutes of physical activity (awareness of what is going on around you while moving your hands and fingers with a pen in a way that results in a line)
The science behind doing it while you are in your various classes: It will help you concentrate on any lecture  and retain more of what you are hearing.
Read ALL about it right here. Then get your flair pen ready. Don’t forget to draw your frame first.  Skate right out to the edges of the image and then fill it on in.
Love,
Professor Sluggo









 

Above: Virgil Finlay

Dear Making Comics Class,

There is so much that can be done with some black ink on a piece of paper or a blade on a black scratch board and some sweet uninterrupted time. Anything that draws a tight edge between jet black and white can take you there. Today in class we talked about spreading our 30 minutes of comp book writing and drawing time across the whole day. This is 30 minutes each day that the back of your mind has to come forward and it has your full attention. It will work even if all you do is  a ten minute non-photo blue drawing in the morning and spend the rest of the day inking it in. And here is nothing wrong with copying a picture you like or even tracing one and working on it all day. The practice is to make sure you do the 30 minutes of physical activity (awareness of what is going on around you while moving your hands and fingers with a pen in a way that results in a line)

The science behind doing it while you are in your various classes: It will help you concentrate on any lecture  and retain more of what you are hearing.

Read ALL about it right here. Then get your flair pen ready. Don’t forget to draw your frame first.  Skate right out to the edges of the image and then fill it on in.


Love,

Professor Sluggo

 

BULLYING THE MACHINE (Fuck Your Town) — Edited by Gorilla Grodd
Assignment: Take a four panel drawing done by another student in the class, cut each panel out, rearrange them into a comic sequence,give them a title, sign your name as editor.
From “Making Comics: Art 448” taught by Professor Sluggo (AKA Lynda Barry) University of Wisconsin-Madison

BULLYING THE MACHINE (Fuck Your Town) — Edited by Gorilla Grodd

Assignment: Take a four panel drawing done by another student in the class, cut each panel out, rearrange them into a comic sequence,give them a title, sign your name as editor.

From “Making Comics: Art 448” taught by Professor Sluggo (AKA Lynda Barry) University of Wisconsin-Madison

This song is how Professor Sluggo felt when she saw the all drawings her class pulled up through the paper into the known world in our “Making Comics” class today.

PS: For those of you who are interested in drawing bodies in motion, get your composition book out and try hitting pause four different times when the Nicholas Brothers are dancing. Take exactly what the pause button gives you, don’t look for a pose you feel like drawing. Try drawing them for three minutes, two minutes, one minute, 45 seconds, like we did with the Ivan Brunetti exercises today.

PPS:  And yes, should you so desire, do it for Cab Calloway too.

Drawings from the first hour of the first day of a class called “Making Comics”, taught by Lynda Barry (aka “Professor Sluggo”) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Students watched a cartoon called “Minnie the Moocher” without knowing they would be asked to draw four characters from the cartoon from memory and they only had two minutes for each drawing. When the time was up, they had to stop. There was no penciling in beforehand, it was straight to ink, using a Flair pen in a standard composition notebook. Students don’t have to have any drawing skills to be part of the class, but they do have to be brave. Professor Sluggo gives her whole class an “A” for this project. Hi-de-hi-de-hi-de-ho!

What do you have IN MIND? Angela Richardson and Lynda Barry host a drawing jam for kids (and the adults they bring with with them) from 10 am to 12:00 noon on Science Saturday, August 3, 2013, in The Image Lab, on the first floor of The Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

thegreatravelledknot:

Let’s jam!

As part of the SATURDAY SCIENCE AT DISCOVERY event at the WID on 8/3, we’ll be hosting a DRAWING JAM at THE IMAGE LAB. It’s when we all get together to MAKE ART! We’ll draw on paper, on each other’s drawings…we’ll even draw on the wall! It will be seriously FUN.

Saturday Science at Discovery is a FREE EVENT for kids and adults. In August, it celebrates SCIENCE, CREATIVITY, and INVENTION. Our theme for the drawing jam is THE HUMAN MIND — since none of that stuff can happen without it, right?

Put on your thinking cap and get ready to draw to your brain’s delight. We’re bringing all of the supplies — the only thing we need you to bring is your IMAGINATION.

Saturday Science at Discovery is held on the first Saturday of every month. at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery (WID) on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus.

The Image Lab is located is the northwest corner of the WID on the first floor. It’s nearest the intersection of University and Randall. See you there on Saturday!

drawpaintprint:

Bimbo’s Initiation

Lynda Barry will be teaching a class called “Making Comics (and other graphic formations)”  ART 448 Fall 2013  at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Wanna be a member?

Check back for further details on application process.

Photos from the last day of The Unthinkable Mind. Students are looking over each other’s final projects.

May 13, 2013, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Photos by Angela Richardson

A minute and a half memory story coming from the word ‘distance’, written in 8 minutes by a student in “The Unthinkable Mind” class.