The Near-Sighted Monkey

Dearest Students,

This is my own composition notebook homework assignment in progress. Professor Chewbacca reflects on the crayon experience. I’ve inked it and now I’m coloring it in

I like to figure out problems in my composition notebook using drawing and slow writing and non-photo blue pencil to help me with certain problems that defy being approached head on. I’ve found there is something to moving ones hand in a certain way — like a coloring way— while filling in a space and half thinking and half not-thinking about this something you are trying to figure out that invites possible answers to present themselves..

Sincerely,

Professor Chewbacca

Page one of first hand-out for students in Lynda Barry’s spring semester classes at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Dear Students,
I’m very much looking forward to our first class tomorrow. Here is page one of the syllabus. 

Sincerely,
Professor Chewbacca

Page one of first hand-out for students in Lynda Barry’s spring semester classes at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Dear Students,

I’m very much looking forward to our first class tomorrow. Here is page one of the syllabus.

Sincerely,

Professor Chewbacca

Doctor Girlfriend’s comp book pages from last weeks Batman and Emily Dickinson mash-up assignment in Making Comics, Art 448, (Taught by Lynda Barry /Professor Sluggo at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.)

Angel Lee, 2013
Final project for “The Unthinkable MInd” class taught by Lynda Barry, University of Wisconsin Madison
Page from a hand-made book, watercolor, ink, glue, text, tape

Angel Lee, 2013

Final project for “The Unthinkable MInd” class taught by Lynda Barry, University of Wisconsin Madison

Page from a hand-made book, watercolor, ink, glue, text, tape

thegreatravelledknot:

Not an image of the brain per se, but rather, all of the blood vessels that feed it. Beautiful. 
byuneuro:

Magnetic Resonance Angiogram of the #Brain
Magnetic resonance angiography (#MRA) is a group of techniques based on magnetic resonance imaging (#MRI) to image #blood vessels. Magnetic resonance #angiography is used to generate images of the arteries in order to evaluate them for stenosis (abnormal narrowing), #occlusion or #aneurysms (vessel wall dilation that is at risk of rupture). #byu #neuroscience

thegreatravelledknot:

Not an image of the brain per se, but rather, all of the blood vessels that feed it. Beautiful.

byuneuro:

Magnetic Resonance Angiogram of the #Brain

Magnetic resonance angiography (#MRA) is a group of techniques based on magnetic resonance imaging (#MRI) to image #blood vessels. Magnetic resonance #angiography is used to generate images of the arteries in order to evaluate them for stenosis (abnormal narrowing), #occlusion or #aneurysms (vessel wall dilation that is at risk of rupture). #byu #neuroscience

The Unthinkable Mind students read comics during class. They also eat candy. They also wrote 40,000 words by hand this semester and did an uncountable number of drawings.

Song:  Nobody   Hodges James Smith and Crawford 1972

Source: The great http://soulmusicsongs.tumblr.com/

Dear Unthinkable Mind Students,

We are going to have a good week together! It’s going to feel like this song sounds. Have you been worried about your book? Projects like this often come together in a completely unexpected way but you may not know what I mean until it happens to you. A surprise presents itself and you follow it and as you work it keeps surprising you. And that is the thing that will help you finish. You’ll want to chase it down until you can run along side it.

This  ‘surprising thing’ that seems to happen in an instant(— often right about the time we are sure it’s all actually horrible—) can only happen after spending the amount of time you all have spent learning and practicing this way of working, this Unthinkable Mind thing, whatever it might be. I am so happy to watch all of your books starting to bloom at once. Pictures from an expedition.

Love,

Professor Old Skull.

"Lesbian Cattle Dogs"
Comics by 2012 “What It Is” class alum,  Lydia Conklin
(Source)
Dear Unthinkable Mind Class, There are a lot of ways of doing your final project for our class. Comics are one of them. 
Professor Old Skull

"Lesbian Cattle Dogs"

Comics by 2012 “What It Is” class alum,  Lydia Conklin

(Source)

Dear Unthinkable Mind Class,
 There are a lot of ways of doing your final project for our class. Comics are one of them.

Professor Old Skull

After reading "The Fourth State of Matter" written by Joanne Beard about a shooting Iowa University campus, students in The Unthinkable Mind class were asked to imagine themselves somewhere at a specific point in the story and then describe what was going on around them. 

This  story lasts for just over a minute.

 What happens to the ordinary moment is unspooling alongside an extraordinary event? The way the sky looks, the way the river smells, the crowded street we jaywalk; the weight of a certain door, the sound of footsteps in a certain hallway. What happens to all of these things once we know the whole story?

How are we able to imagine this? How are we able to put ourselves in another person’s story? Does this mean a story is also a place?

One day Professor Old Skull passed out index cards to The Unthinkable Mind Class and asked them to fold them in half and write a made-up title of a book on the top of each one. Then she passed out photocopies of pictures the class had drawn earlier in the quarter using an exercise from “Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice” by Ivan Brunetti

Professor Old Skull asked the class to cut the pictures apart up and paste one on each of index card as if it were the bookcover illustration. Then she gathered the cards, mixed them up and passed them out again and asked students to turn the ‘nano book’ over and write a genre type on the back without looking at the title.

Then she mixed them up again, passed them out one last time, and gave students less than two minutes to write the first line of the book based on title, genre, and cover illustration.

From The Unthinkable Mind Nano Book Project, University of Wisconsin-Madison, taught by Lynda Barry

One day Professor Old Skull asked her Unthinkable Mind Students to do the exercise found on page 37 in Ivan Brunetti’s book,  “Cartooning, Practice and Philosophy” but instead of doing each drawing on a separate index card, they folded a sheet of 8.5 x 11 paper into 12 panels and drew the following scenarios:

A) The beginning of the world
B)The end of the world
C) A self-portrait, including your entire body
D)Something that happened at lunchtime (or breakfast if it is still morning)
E) An image from a dream you had recently
F)Something that happened in the middle of the world’s existence
G)What happened right after that?
H) Something that happened early this morning
J)Pick any of the above panels and draw something that happened immediately afterward
K)Draw a ‘riff’ on panel ‘J’
L) Finally, draw something that has absolutely nothing to do with anything else you have drawn in the other panels.

A few days later, Professor Old Skull asked them to cut the panels apart and mix them up. Then she gave them a poem written by Thomas Treherne in the mid 1600’s and asked them to cut the poem up into 12 parts, maintaining the original order of the poem. Then students were asked to glue a panel above each part of the poem, trying to find which pictures made the page have a kind of resonance that can happen when two things don’t match up literally, but have some sort of swing between them.

It’s a good way to get to know a poem, repeating it. Learning it sideways, as if it were a song.

This sequence features the work of Spinal Cord, Prefrontal Cortex and Brain Stem

One day Professor Old Skull asked her Unthinkable Mind Students to do the exercise found on page 37 in Ivan Brunetti’s book,  “Cartooning, Practice and Philosophy” but instead of doing each drawing on a separate index card, they folded a sheet of 8.5 x 11 paper into 12 panels and drew the following scenarios:

A) The beginning of the world
B)The end of the world
C) A self-portrait, including your entire body
D)Something that happened at lunchtime (or breakfast if it is still morning)
E) An image from a dream you had recently
F)Something that happened in the middle of the world’s existence
G)What happened right after that?
H) Something that happened early this morning
J)Pick any of the above panels and draw something that happened immediately afterward
K)Draw a ‘riff’ on panel ‘J’
L) Finally, draw something that has absolutely nothing to do with anything else you have drawn in the other panels.

A few days later, Professor Old Skull asked them to cut the panels apart and mix them up. Then she gave them a poem written by Thomas Treherne in the mid 1600’s and asked them to cut the poem up into 12 parts, maintaining the original order of the poem. Then students were asked to glue a panel above each part of the poem, trying to find which pictures made the page have a kind of resonance that can happen when two things don’t match up literally, but have some sort of swing between them.

It’s a good way to get to know a poem, repeating it. Learning it sideways, as if it were a song.


This sequence features the work of Frontal Lobes, Corpus Callosum and Amygdala

Dearest Unthinkable Mind Students,

Does Feynman’s explanation of hot and cold transfer and jiggling atoms work as a metaphor to help us understand how images are transferred?

Best to you from Professor Old Skull.

Physicist Richard Feynman thinks aloud about atoms and how they jiggle, and how we perceive that jiggling as ‘hot’ and ‘cold’. From the BBC TV series ‘Fun to Imagine’(1983). You can now watch higher quality versions of some of these episodes at www.bbc.co.uk/archive/feynman/


We love this video and we thank our wonderful Occipital Lobe for finding it for us.

Dear Unthinkable Mind Class,

This is our handout for Wednesday, March 13, 2013.

Prof. Old Skull

Dearest Unthinkable Mind class,

This is our handout for Monday, March 12, 2013.

Prof. Old Skull