The Near-Sighted Monkey
Thank-you to Nick Sousanis for bringing this article to our attention
WHAT’S LOST AS HANDWRITING FADES?

By MARIA KONNIKOVA JUNE 2, 2014
New York Times


Does handwriting matter?
Not very much, according to many educators. The Common Core standards, which have been adopted in most states, call for teaching legible writing, but only in kindergarten and first grade. After that, the emphasis quickly shifts to proficiency on the keyboard.
But psychologists and neuroscientists say it is far too soon to declare handwriting a relic of the past. New evidence suggests that the links between handwriting and broader educational development run deep.
Children not only learn to read more quickly when they first learn to write by hand, but they also remain better able to generate ideas and retain information. In other words, it’s not just what we write that matters — but how.
“When we write, a unique neural circuit is automatically activated,” said Stanislas Dehaene, a psychologist at the Collège de France in Paris. “There is a core recognition of the gesture in the written word, a sort of recognition by mental simulation in your brain.
“And it seems that this circuit is contributing in unique ways we didn’t realize,” he continued. “Learning is made easier.”
A 2012 study led by Karin James, a psychologist at Indiana University, lent support to that view. Children who had not yet learned to read and write were presented with a letter or a shape on an index card and asked to reproduce it in one of three ways: trace the image on a page with a dotted outline, draw it on a blank white sheet, or type it on a computer. They were then placed in a brain scanner and shown the image again.
The researchers found that the initial duplication process mattered a great deal. When children had drawn a letter freehand, they exhibited increased activity in three areas of the brain that are activated in adults when they read and write: the left fusiform gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus and the posterior parietal cortex.
By contrast, children who typed or traced the letter or shape showed no such effect. The activation was significantly weaker.
Dr. James attributes the differences to the messiness inherent in free-form handwriting: Not only must we first plan and execute the action in a way that is not required when we have a traceable outline, but we are also likely to produce a result that is highly variable.
That variability may itself be a learning tool. “When a kid produces a messy letter,” Dr. James said, “that might help him learn it.”
Photo


Karin James, a psychologist at Indiana University, used a scanner to see how handwriting affected activity in children’s brains.  Credit A. J. Mast for The New York Times  
Our brain must understand that each possible iteration of, say, an “a” is the same, no matter how we see it written. Being able to decipher the messiness of each “a” may be more helpful in establishing that eventual representation than seeing the same result repeatedly.
“This is one of the first demonstrations of the brain being changed because of that practice,” Dr. James said.
In another study, Dr. James is comparing children who physically form letters with those who only watch others doing it. Her observations suggest that it is only the actual effort that engages the brain’s motor pathways and delivers the learning benefits of handwriting.
The effect goes well beyond letter recognition. In a study that followed children in grades two through five, Virginia Berninger, a psychologist at the University of Washington, demonstrated that printing, cursive writing, and typing on a keyboard are all associated with distinct and separate brain patterns — and each results in a distinct end product. When the children composed text by hand, they not only consistently produced more words more quickly than they did on a keyboard, but expressed more ideas. And brain imaging in the oldest subjects suggested that the connection between writing and idea generation went even further. When these children were asked to come up with ideas for a composition, the ones with better handwriting exhibited greater neural activation in areas associated with working memory — and increased overall activation in the reading and writing networks.
It now appears that there may even be a difference between printing and cursive writing — a distinction of particular importance as the teaching of cursive disappears in curriculum after curriculum. In dysgraphia, a condition where the ability to write is impaired, sometimes after brain injury, the deficit can take on a curious form: In some people, cursive writing remains relatively unimpaired, while in others, printing does.


Samples of handwriting by young children. Dr. James found that when children drew a letter freehand, they exhibited increased activity in three significant areas of the brain, which didn’t happen when they traced or typed the letter.  Credit Karin James 
In alexia, or impaired reading ability, some individuals who are unable to process print can still read cursive, and vice versa — suggesting that the two writing modes activate separate brain networks and engage more cognitive resources than would be the case with a single approach.
Dr. Berninger goes so far as to suggest that cursive writing may train self-control ability in a way that other modes of writing do not, and some researchers argue that it may even be a path to treating dyslexia. A 2012 review suggests that cursive may be particularly effective for individuals with developmental dysgraphia — motor-control difficulties in forming letters — and that it may aid in preventing the reversal and inversion of letters.
Cursive or not, the benefits of writing by hand extend beyond childhood. For adults, typing may be a fast and efficient alternative to longhand, but that very efficiency may diminish our ability to process new information. Not only do we learn letters better when we commit them to memory through writing, memory and learning ability in general may benefit.
Two psychologists, Pam A. Mueller of Princeton and Daniel M. Oppenheimer of the University of California, Los Angeles, have reported that in both laboratory settings and real-world classrooms, students learn better when they take notes by hand than when they type on a keyboard. Contrary to earlier studies attributing the difference to the distracting effects of computers, the new research suggests that writing by hand allows the student to process a lecture’s contents and reframe it — a process of reflection and manipulation that can lead to better understanding and memory encoding.
Not every expert is persuaded that the long-term benefits of handwriting are as significant as all that. Still, one such skeptic, the Yale psychologist Paul Bloom, says the new research is, at the very least, thought-provoking.
“With handwriting, the very act of putting it down forces you to focus on what’s important,” he said. He added, after pausing to consider, “Maybe it helps you think better.”

Maria Konnikova is a contributing writer for The New Yorker online and the author of “Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes.

Thank-you to Nick Sousanis for bringing this article to our attention

WHAT’S LOST AS HANDWRITING FADES?

Does handwriting matter?

Not very much, according to many educators. The Common Core standards, which have been adopted in most states, call for teaching legible writing, but only in kindergarten and first grade. After that, the emphasis quickly shifts to proficiency on the keyboard.

But psychologists and neuroscientists say it is far too soon to declare handwriting a relic of the past. New evidence suggests that the links between handwriting and broader educational development run deep.

Children not only learn to read more quickly when they first learn to write by hand, but they also remain better able to generate ideas and retain information. In other words, it’s not just what we write that matters — but how.

“When we write, a unique neural circuit is automatically activated,” said Stanislas Dehaene, a psychologist at the Collège de France in Paris. “There is a core recognition of the gesture in the written word, a sort of recognition by mental simulation in your brain.

“And it seems that this circuit is contributing in unique ways we didn’t realize,” he continued. “Learning is made easier.”

A 2012 study led by Karin James, a psychologist at Indiana University, lent support to that view. Children who had not yet learned to read and write were presented with a letter or a shape on an index card and asked to reproduce it in one of three ways: trace the image on a page with a dotted outline, draw it on a blank white sheet, or type it on a computer. They were then placed in a brain scanner and shown the image again.

The researchers found that the initial duplication process mattered a great deal. When children had drawn a letter freehand, they exhibited increased activity in three areas of the brain that are activated in adults when they read and write: the left fusiform gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus and the posterior parietal cortex.

By contrast, children who typed or traced the letter or shape showed no such effect. The activation was significantly weaker.

Dr. James attributes the differences to the messiness inherent in free-form handwriting: Not only must we first plan and execute the action in a way that is not required when we have a traceable outline, but we are also likely to produce a result that is highly variable.

That variability may itself be a learning tool. “When a kid produces a messy letter,” Dr. James said, “that might help him learn it.”

Photo

Karin James, a psychologist at Indiana University, used a scanner to see how handwriting affected activity in children’s brains. Credit A. J. Mast for The New York Times

Our brain must understand that each possible iteration of, say, an “a” is the same, no matter how we see it written. Being able to decipher the messiness of each “a” may be more helpful in establishing that eventual representation than seeing the same result repeatedly.

“This is one of the first demonstrations of the brain being changed because of that practice,” Dr. James said.

In another study, Dr. James is comparing children who physically form letters with those who only watch others doing it. Her observations suggest that it is only the actual effort that engages the brain’s motor pathways and delivers the learning benefits of handwriting.

The effect goes well beyond letter recognition. In a study that followed children in grades two through five, Virginia Berninger, a psychologist at the University of Washington, demonstrated that printing, cursive writing, and typing on a keyboard are all associated with distinct and separate brain patterns — and each results in a distinct end product. When the children composed text by hand, they not only consistently produced more words more quickly than they did on a keyboard, but expressed more ideas. And brain imaging in the oldest subjects suggested that the connection between writing and idea generation went even further. When these children were asked to come up with ideas for a composition, the ones with better handwriting exhibited greater neural activation in areas associated with working memory — and increased overall activation in the reading and writing networks.

It now appears that there may even be a difference between printing and cursive writing — a distinction of particular importance as the teaching of cursive disappears in curriculum after curriculum. In dysgraphia, a condition where the ability to write is impaired, sometimes after brain injury, the deficit can take on a curious form: In some people, cursive writing remains relatively unimpaired, while in others, printing does.

Samples of handwriting by young children. Dr. James found that when children drew a letter freehand, they exhibited increased activity in three significant areas of the brain, which didn’t happen when they traced or typed the letter. Credit Karin James

In alexia, or impaired reading ability, some individuals who are unable to process print can still read cursive, and vice versa — suggesting that the two writing modes activate separate brain networks and engage more cognitive resources than would be the case with a single approach.

Dr. Berninger goes so far as to suggest that cursive writing may train self-control ability in a way that other modes of writing do not, and some researchers argue that it may even be a path to treating dyslexia. A 2012 review suggests that cursive may be particularly effective for individuals with developmental dysgraphia — motor-control difficulties in forming letters — and that it may aid in preventing the reversal and inversion of letters.

Cursive or not, the benefits of writing by hand extend beyond childhood. For adults, typing may be a fast and efficient alternative to longhand, but that very efficiency may diminish our ability to process new information. Not only do we learn letters better when we commit them to memory through writing, memory and learning ability in general may benefit.

Two psychologists, Pam A. Mueller of Princeton and Daniel M. Oppenheimer of the University of California, Los Angeles, have reported that in both laboratory settings and real-world classrooms, students learn better when they take notes by hand than when they type on a keyboard. Contrary to earlier studies attributing the difference to the distracting effects of computers, the new research suggests that writing by hand allows the student to process a lecture’s contents and reframe it — a process of reflection and manipulation that can lead to better understanding and memory encoding.

Not every expert is persuaded that the long-term benefits of handwriting are as significant as all that. Still, one such skeptic, the Yale psychologist Paul Bloom, says the new research is, at the very least, thought-provoking.

“With handwriting, the very act of putting it down forces you to focus on what’s important,” he said. He added, after pausing to consider, “Maybe it helps you think better.”

Maria Konnikova is a contributing writer for The New Yorker online and the author of “Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes.

From the July 18, 2013 Image Lab field trip to the Madison Children’s Museum, to see an exhibit of images of the brain and the mind made by kids.
Julianna, Eagle School
"In this picture, titled "The Amygdala & Prefrontal Cortex", a girl and a cat represent the prefrontal cortex and amygdala. When the amygdala acts up, you feel scared. The prefrontal cortex calms the amygdala."

From the July 18, 2013 Image Lab field trip to the Madison Children’s Museum, to see an exhibit of images of the brain and the mind made by kids.

Julianna, Eagle School

"In this picture, titled "The Amygdala & Prefrontal Cortex", a girl and a cat represent the prefrontal cortex and amygdala. When the amygdala acts up, you feel scared. The prefrontal cortex calms the amygdala."

Today’s Image Lab field trip: Angela Richardson and Professor Long-Title go to the Madison Children’s Museum to see kids making visual images of the brain and mind.
"Brain Art" by Rhys Enderle, age 14, Eagle School
"The whole shape is the brain, while the yellow center is the center of thought. All the thoughts, the good, (pink) and the bad (black) ripple outwards"

Today’s Image Lab field trip: Angela Richardson and Professor Long-Title go to the Madison Children’s Museum to see kids making visual images of the brain and mind.

"Brain Art" by Rhys Enderle, age 14, Eagle School

"The whole shape is the brain, while the yellow center is the center of thought. All the thoughts, the good, (pink) and the bad (black) ripple outwards"

Angela Richardson is the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery’s Image Lab’s first artist in residence and investigator. She’s working on a project about how we visualize the brain and the mind. Walk-ins welcome! University of Wisconsin-Madison. Mon-Weds 10-2, Tues-Thurs 2-6

Angela Richardson is the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery’s Image Lab’s first artist in residence and investigator. She’s working on a project about how we visualize the brain and the mind. Walk-ins welcome! University of Wisconsin-Madison. Mon-Weds 10-2, Tues-Thurs 2-6

thegreatravelledknot:

Travelling sparks hurrying hither and tither

I’ve continued to contemplate Sherrington’s beautiful quote about the brain. I decided to write it out longhand in continuous cursive on a window of The Image Lab. Wanting to make a drawing to accompany it I found a diagram of "overlapping neuronal fields" attributed to Sherrington on the UIC website. Searching further I found a photo by Schutz on wiki showing the stained glass window at Cambridge made in Sherrington’s honor. I like this image very much and made several iterations of it myself - on the window, on the whiteboard wall, on paper.

What happens when you re-draw (or trace or color in) someone else’s drawing? Is it like re-telling a joke you heard? How is re-drawing a drawing different than just looking at it? What happens in your hands when you do? What happens in your brain?

I think that by re-drawing a drawing my body gains some understanding of an image that I cannot have just by looking. There is something unique to be discovered in the tracing of lines and making of marks that can’t be known any other way. It’s something like the difference between merely watching a dance and actually trying to dance the steps yourself.

Image sources: the original diagram is from “Sherrington’s Ferrier lecture, 1929” and posted on UIC’s Dept of Neurology website. Stained glass window photo is by author [wikipedia] User:Schutz. Permission (Reusing this file) Creative Commons-by-sa 2.5 “The stained glass was designed by Maria McClafferty and installed in 1992–1992.”

We found these images after we started thinking about a question posed by “What It Is” alumni, Angela Richardson  and Meridith Beck Sayer

When we picture the mind and the brain what do we see? Where do those images come from? What are they based on?

They’re working on a project called “IN THE MIND’S EYE”. about the history of visual representations of brain and the mind. It’s coming to The Image Lab, University of Wisconsin-Madison, during the month of July.

Near-Sighted Monkey Lounge heartthrob Eric Kandel talks about creativity and hemispheric differences of the brain.

On February 27, 2013, students in Lynda Barry’s  “Unthinkable Mind” class at the University of Wisconsin-Madison were given a piece of paper and a flair pen and asked to draw a picture that they couldn’t see. Professor Old Skull was the only one who could see the picture, and she described it line by line, asking them to draw along with the description. What happened? The picture Professor Old Skull was describing appears at the end of the video.

On Monday, March 4th——
Log on to hear the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Dr. Davidson’s talk on Monday, March 4th. It’s free. 
Join Dr. Richard J. Davidson, founder of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds, and 31 inspiring meditation experts and luminaries for a FREE online conference, “Be the Change Meditation,” next week.  Don’t miss Dr. Davidson’s talk, “The  Meditating Brain”, on Monday, March 4 at 6pm CST, which will touch on:  -How meditation impacts mental and emotional circuits -The three types of meditation and how each affects the brain differently -His research that found that 30 minutes of daily practice for 2 weeks can produce profound and discernible changes in the brain  Click here to register

On Monday, March 4th——

Log on to hear the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Dr. Davidson’s talk on Monday, March 4th. It’s free.

Join Dr. Richard J. Davidson, founder of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds, and 31 inspiring meditation experts and luminaries for a FREE online conference, “Be the Change Meditation,” next week.

Don’t miss Dr. Davidson’s talk, “The  Meditating Brain”, on Monday, March 4 at 6pm CST, which will touch on:

-How meditation impacts mental and emotional circuits
-The three types of meditation and how each affects the brain differently
-His research that found that 30 minutes of daily practice for 2 weeks can produce profound and discernible changes in the brain


  Click here to register

Dear Unthinkable Mind Students,

Here’s the handout from Wednesday’s class. There is a storm coming. Draw and watercolor some fire if you get cold.

We didn’t get to all of the things on the agenda on Wednesday’s class so there is no four panel drawing. Instead I handed back the drawings you’ve done since January 24th and asked you to cut them up and paste them into your composition notebooks using white school glue and your bone folder to flatten the image you glue.

Please disregard the part of the handout that that says “Cut and paste 4 pages” —- we’ll get to this next week.

Links to things we watched and heard during Wednesday’s class

The Mystery of Memory -  at Nobelprize.org

The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction - NYTimes.com

Remembering the past to imagine the future: Nature.com Neuroscience

Brain Scans Of The Future — Psychologists Use fMRI To Understand ties between memories and the imagination

See you Monday,

Professor Old Skull

Dear Unthinkable Mind Class,

Here are some of the three demon heads you colored while watching and listening to various presentations about hemispheric differences in the brain.

And these are some of the things from the ‘test’ we took on what you remembered about Iain McGilchrist’s work.

I’m looking forward to speaking to each of you one on one in the next two days.

Love from,

Professor Lynda (AKA “Old Skull”)

Question: Can something as simple as coloring a picture increase our ability to sustain an open sort of concentration and remember more of what we’ve heard?

Answer: Scientific research says YES.

Read: Doodling and the default network of the brain (Lancet)
And: “Doodling may help memory recall” (BBC)

How does the human brain keep track of time? Short interview with Luke Jones from the University of Manchester.

University of Manchester School of Psychological Sciences: http://www.psych-sci.manchester.ac.uk/

Videos by Brady Haran
http://www.bradyharan.com/

Extra credit question for Unthinkable Mind students: What is Luke Jones doing with his hands (starting at about 2:45) while he explains how we experience duration of time? Why might he be doing this? If you turned the sound off, and all you could see here his hands, what would you think he was talking about? What would you think he was feeling right then?

This is a letter from Lynda Barry to the students in The Unthinkable Mind which begins on January 23, 2013 at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. The class is composed of 21 graduate and undergraduate students; eight with interests in the sciences, eight with interests in the humanities, and five wild cards.

It’s a writing and picture-making class with focus on the basic physical structure of the brain with emphasis on hemispheric differences and a particular sort of insight and creative concentration that seems to come about when we are using our hands (-the original digital devices) —to help us figure out a problem.

No artistic talent is required to be part of this class, but students must have an active interest in learning about the physical structure of the brain, how memory, metaphor, pictures and stories work together, the relationship between our hands and thinking, and what the biological function of the thing we call ‘the arts’ may be.

This is a rigorous class with a substantial workload. Along with twice weekly writing, picture making, and memorization assignments, students will be required to complete a handmade book using visual and written elements by the end of the semester.

Before the first meeting, students will have read the introduction to Iain McGilchrist’s book on the brain’s hemispheric differences, “The Master and His Emissary” (Download Introduction) and will have memorized Emily Dickinson’s poem number 937

I felt a Cleaving in my Mind —
As if my Brain had split —
I tried to match it — Seam by Seam —
But could not make it fit.

The thought behind, I strove to join
Unto the thought before —
But Sequence raveled out of Sound
Like Balls — upon a Floor.

Class activities, assignments and relevant material will be posted on this tumblr page throughout the semester.

SOURCE: Nature.com

The split brain: A tale of two halves
In the first months after her surgery, shopping for groceries was infuriating. Standing in the supermarket aisle, Vicki would look at an item on the shelf and know that she wanted to place it in her trolley — but she couldn’t. “I’d reach with my right for the thing I wanted, but the left would come in and they’d kind of fight,” she says. “Almost like repelling magnets.” Picking out food for the week was a two-, sometimes three-hour ordeal. Getting dressed posed a similar challenge: Vicki couldn’t reconcile what she wanted to put on with what her hands were doing. Sometimes she ended up wearing three outfits at once. “I’d have to dump all the clothes on the bed, catch my breath and start again.”
In one crucial way, however, Vicki was better than her pre-surgery self. She was no longer racked by epileptic seizures that were so severe they had made her life close to unbearable. She once collapsed onto the bar of an old-fashioned oven, burning and scarring her back. “I really just couldn’t function,” she says. When, in 1978, her neurologist told her about a radical but dangerous surgery that might help, she barely hesitated. If the worst were to happen, she knew that her parents would take care of her young daughter. “But of course I worried,” she says. “When you get your brain split, it doesn’t grow back together.”
In June 1979, in a procedure that lasted nearly 10 hours, doctors created a firebreak to contain Vicki’s seizures by slicing through her corpus callosum, the bundle of neuronal fibres connecting the two sides of her brain. This drastic procedure, called a corpus callosotomy, disconnects the two sides of the neocortex, the home of language, conscious thought and movement control. Vicki’s supermarket predicament was the consequence of a brain that behaved in some ways as if it were two separate minds.
After about a year, Vicki’s difficulties abated. “I could get things together,” she says. For the most part she was herself: slicing vegetables, tying her shoe laces, playing cards, even waterskiing.
But what Vicki could never have known was that her surgery would turn her into an accidental superstar of neuroscience. She is one of fewer than a dozen ‘split-brain’ patients, whose brains and behaviours have been subject to countless hours of experiments, hundreds of scientific papers, and references in just about every psychology textbook of the past generation. And now their numbers are dwindling.
Through studies of this group, neuroscientists now know that the healthy brain can look like two markedly different machines, cabled together and exchanging a torrent of data. But when the primary cable is severed, information — a word, an object, a picture — presented to one hemisphere goes unnoticed in the other. Michael Gazzaniga, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the godfather of modern split-brain science, says that even after working with these patients for five decades, he still finds it thrilling to observe the disconnection effects first-hand. “You see a split-brain patient just doing a standard thing — you show him an image and he can’t say what it is. But he can pull that same object out of a grab-bag,” Gazzaniga says. “Your heart just races!”
Continue reading

thanks to neurosciencestuff for bringing this article to our attention

SOURCE: Nature.com

The split brain: A tale of two halves

In the first months after her surgery, shopping for groceries was infuriating. Standing in the supermarket aisle, Vicki would look at an item on the shelf and know that she wanted to place it in her trolley — but she couldn’t. “I’d reach with my right for the thing I wanted, but the left would come in and they’d kind of fight,” she says. “Almost like repelling magnets.” Picking out food for the week was a two-, sometimes three-hour ordeal. Getting dressed posed a similar challenge: Vicki couldn’t reconcile what she wanted to put on with what her hands were doing. Sometimes she ended up wearing three outfits at once. “I’d have to dump all the clothes on the bed, catch my breath and start again.”

In one crucial way, however, Vicki was better than her pre-surgery self. She was no longer racked by epileptic seizures that were so severe they had made her life close to unbearable. She once collapsed onto the bar of an old-fashioned oven, burning and scarring her back. “I really just couldn’t function,” she says. When, in 1978, her neurologist told her about a radical but dangerous surgery that might help, she barely hesitated. If the worst were to happen, she knew that her parents would take care of her young daughter. “But of course I worried,” she says. “When you get your brain split, it doesn’t grow back together.”

In June 1979, in a procedure that lasted nearly 10 hours, doctors created a firebreak to contain Vicki’s seizures by slicing through her corpus callosum, the bundle of neuronal fibres connecting the two sides of her brain. This drastic procedure, called a corpus callosotomy, disconnects the two sides of the neocortex, the home of language, conscious thought and movement control. Vicki’s supermarket predicament was the consequence of a brain that behaved in some ways as if it were two separate minds.

After about a year, Vicki’s difficulties abated. “I could get things together,” she says. For the most part she was herself: slicing vegetables, tying her shoe laces, playing cards, even waterskiing.

But what Vicki could never have known was that her surgery would turn her into an accidental superstar of neuroscience. She is one of fewer than a dozen ‘split-brain’ patients, whose brains and behaviours have been subject to countless hours of experiments, hundreds of scientific papers, and references in just about every psychology textbook of the past generation. And now their numbers are dwindling.

Through studies of this group, neuroscientists now know that the healthy brain can look like two markedly different machines, cabled together and exchanging a torrent of data. But when the primary cable is severed, information — a word, an object, a picture — presented to one hemisphere goes unnoticed in the other. Michael Gazzaniga, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the godfather of modern split-brain science, says that even after working with these patients for five decades, he still finds it thrilling to observe the disconnection effects first-hand. “You see a split-brain patient just doing a standard thing — you show him an image and he can’t say what it is. But he can pull that same object out of a grab-bag,” Gazzaniga says. “Your heart just races!”

Continue reading

thanks to neurosciencestuff for bringing this article to our attention

From “What It Is” by Lynda Barry, who will be teaching an Art/Science/English class next Spring Semester at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
About the class:
THE UNTHINKABLE MIND 
Art 469 —-English/Creative writing 307 —— Science (Course number to come)
Spring 2013
Day: Mon/Weds
Time: 1:20 -3:50
Location: 6261 Humanities 
Limit: 20 Students, composed of eight students whose main interests are in the Humanities, eight students whose main interests are in the Sciences, and four wild cards.
Credits 3-4
Instructor: Lynda Barry
A writing and picture-making class with focus on the basic physical structure of the brain with emphasis on hemispheric differences and a particular sort of insight and creative concentration that seems to come about when we are using our hands (-the original digital devices) —to help us figure out a problem.
No artistic talent is required to be part of this class, but students must have an active interest in learning about the physical structure of the brain, how memory, metaphor, pictures and stories work together, the relationship between our hands and thinking, and what the biological function of the thing we call ‘the arts’ may be.
To apply….

From “What It Is” by Lynda Barry, who will be teaching an Art/Science/English class next Spring Semester at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

About the class:

THE UNTHINKABLE MIND 

Art 469 —-English/Creative writing 307 —— Science (Course number to come)

Spring 2013

Day: Mon/Weds

Time: 1:20 -3:50

Location: 6261 Humanities

Limit: 20 Students, composed of eight students whose main interests are in the Humanities, eight students whose main interests are in the Sciences, and four wild cards.

Credits 3-4

Instructor: Lynda Barry

A writing and picture-making class with focus on the basic physical structure of the brain with emphasis on hemispheric differences and a particular sort of insight and creative concentration that seems to come about when we are using our hands (-the original digital devices) —to help us figure out a problem.

No artistic talent is required to be part of this class, but students must have an active interest in learning about the physical structure of the brain, how memory, metaphor, pictures and stories work together, the relationship between our hands and thinking, and what the biological function of the thing we call ‘the arts’ may be.

To apply….